Animations of linkage movement.

Design Research Xian

Design Research in China: Xi’an

Design Research Xian

Design Research Xian

This video of our visit to Xi’an captures the beauty of the city and its surroundings, as well as the personality of the excellent professors and students at Xidian University.

For our colleagues in China, here is a link to a Youku version of this video: http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMTg2MzQ5NDI4MA==.html

Youku Xian Video

Youku Xian Video

Trifolium prototype

Prototype of the Trifolium Mechanism

Trifolium prototype

Trifolium prototype

Yang Liu and Peter Yang designed and built this physical prototype of our Trifolium mechanism.  It is fabricated from ABS using the Stratasys Fortus system in UCI’s Institute for Design and Manufacturing Innovation.

Our Chinese colleagues can view this video on Youku at the link: http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMTg2MzQ2MjE5Mg==.html

Youku Trifolium Prototype

Youku Trifolium Prototype

Prototype Butterfly Linkage

Manufacturing Prototype for the Butterfly Linkage

Prototype Butterfly Linkage

Prototype Butterfly Linkage

This animation is taken from Yang Liu’s detailed design drawings for the manufacturing prototype of the Butterfly Linkage. The component parts are to be constructed by additive manufacturing.

This animation includes the music of Explosions in the Sky:

For our colleagues in China this animation is available through youku.com: http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMTgzMzA5ODQyOA==.html

Youku Prototype Butterfly

Youku Prototype Butterfly

Whale Linkage

Bezier Linkages

Whale Linkage

Whale Linkage

Recent research on the design of linkages by Yang Liu has resulted in “Bezier linkages” that can be used to draw arbitrary Bezier curves. The trick is to use trigonometric Bezier curves. This whale consists of four Bezier segments and is drawn by four Bezier linkage elements.

This youtube version includes music by Explosions in the Sky:

A youku.com version for colleagues in China can be seen here:
http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMTgzMjU4NTQwMA==.html

Whale on Youku

Whale on Youku

Mechanisms and Robotics Conference

2016 Mechanisms and Robotics Conference

Mechanisms and Robotics Conference

Symposia organized for the 2016 Mechanisms and Robotics Conference

The 2016 Mechanisms and Robotics conference is part of International Design Engineering Technical Conferences organized by ASME International in Charlotte, North Caroline, August 22-24.

Plenary speaker Bernard Roth is the Academic Director of Stanford University’s d.school and the author of the Achievement Habit.

For some reason, ASME has broken these links to the 2016 IDETC conference, but you can find out more about each of the symposia at the conference overview link: 2016 ASME Mechanism and Robotics Conference Overview.  Then select the Expand all Symposia Link to see the sessions and a list of papers.

 

MotionGen Horse

Motion Gen Linkage Design App

MotionGen is a planar four-bar linkage simulation and synthesis app that helps users synthesize planar four-bar linkages by assembling two of the planar RR-, RP- and PR-dyad types, (R refers to a revolute or hinged joint and P refers to a prismatic or sliding joint).

The input task is a planar motion given as a set of discrete positions and orientations and the app computes type and dimensions of synthesized planar four-bar linkages, where their coupler interpolates through the given poses either exactly or approximately while minimizing an algebraic fitting error.  The algorithm implemented in the app extracts the geometric constraints (circular, fixed-line or line-tangent-to-a-circle) implicit in a given motion and matches them with corresponding mechanical dyad types enumerated earlier.  In the process, the dimensions of the dyads are also computed. By picking two dyads at a time, a planar four-bar linkage is formed. Due to the degree of polynomial system created in the solution, up to a total of six four-bar linkages can be computed for a given motion.

 

MotionGen display

MotionGen display

MotionGen also lets users simulate planar four-bar linkages by assembling the constraints of planar dyads on a blank- or image-overlaid screen. This constraint-based simulation approach mirrors the synthesis approach and allows users to input simple geometric features (circles and lines) for assembly and animation. As an example of the Simulation capabilities of the app, Figure shows a walking robot driven by two sets of planar four-bar linkages where the foot approximately traces a trajectory of walking motion. The users can input two dyads on top of an imported image of a robot or machine to verify the motion and make interactive changes to the trajectories.

Anurag Purwar describes MotionGen and its applications in this video:

MotionGen is available as a free download at both Google Play- and Apple’s iTunes-Stores.

 

Trifolium Contra-parallelograms

Trifolium using contra-parallelograms

Trifolium Contra-parallelograms

Trifolium Contra-parallelograms

Yang Liu shows that a simple linkage can draw the trifolium curve.

For comparison here is the Kempe linkage that draws a trifolium curve obtained by Alexander Kobel.

Fourier Curve Tracing

Fourier Curve Tracing

Fourier Curve Tracing

Fourier Curve Tracing


This animation by Yang Liu is inspired by the mechanical Fourier synthesizer described by Dayton Miller, see A 32-element harmonic synthesizer.

This mechanical system combines the terms of a Fourier approximation of the batman curve found on Wolfram.com. The video below shows this device draws the batman curve.

SIAM News

SIAM News: Biologically inspired linkage design

SIAM News

SIAM News

This article by Jon Hauenstein with me for SIAM News (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) describes research by Mark Plecnik in the computer-aided design of linkages to provide mechanical movement of a bird’s wing. Here is Mark’s video of the his wing flapping mechanism.

Heart Linkage

Heart Trajectory

Heart Linkage

Heart Linkage

This mechanical system was designed by Yang Liu to trace the shape of a heart. The work is inspired by the mechanical 32-element harmonic synthesizer described by Dayton Miller in the 1916 article in the Journal of the Franklin Institute.